007 Parallel components – Resistors – Light emitting diodes LEDS – Capacitors

Parallel components have the same voltage across them.

Parallel resistors LEDs and capacitors schematics diagram by Electronzap Electronzapdotcom
Parallel resistors LEDs and capacitors schematics diagram by Electronzap Electronzapdotcom

Diagram:

Basic electronics circuit fragments and simple circuits 5 Parallel components Resistors LEDs Capacitors diagram by electronzap electronzapdotcom
Basic electronics circuit fragments and simple circuits 5 Parallel components Resistors LEDs Capacitors diagram by electronzap electronzapdotcom

Video:

Electronics course 7 Parallel components resistors LEDs and capacitors tutorial by electronzap

Basic Properties

  • Resistors in parallel gives an equivalent of lower resistance than any of their rated values. There is an equal voltage across parallel components, and how much current passes through parallel resistors is determined by the voltage, and their resistance.

Therefore, 2 equal value resistors will pass twice the total current, and thus act like (equivalent to) a single resistor with half the resistance of one of the equal value resistors. Each one of the resistors will get less hot that a single resistor , which is a benefit if heat is a concern with using a single resistor.

  • Diodes/LEDs need a certain amount of voltage while forward biased. After that voltage is exceeded, they start passing current pretty much freely and hold the voltage at that point with little change. Therefore,  diodes that have the same forward voltage will split the current evenly among them.

If a diode has the lowest forward voltage, then it will pass all the current which will prevent the voltage from rising high enough to power any of the other diodes that have a higher forward voltage.

Total current still needs to be set by a resistor or current source.

  • Capacitance simply adds up when capacitors are connected in parallel.

Every capacitor in parallel is at the same voltage, So they must all be rated to handle the highest voltage that they will be charged to.

Make sure that large value capacitors (especially low resistance supercapacitors), and very high voltage capacitors are charged/discharged to the same voltage before they are connected in parallel because the higher voltage capacitor will instantly charge the lower voltage capacitor. That may result in too much current flow at the moment when you connect them.

Using the higher voltage capacitor to charge a lower voltage capacitor through a resistor is a safe way to make sure that they have equal voltage before connecting them directly.

Low value capacitors can safely be charged/discharged instantly as not much current flows.

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The ad above is to a best selling multimeter since the ones I use are unfortunately not being sold anymore. It still helps this site if you click the link, check out the meter and compare it with other meters to see what looks best for you!



A lot of the components that I use are in this diode and transistor semiconductor kit.



Nice looking LED kit. Good to have a lot of LEDs because it’s relatively easy to damage them, or to want to use a lot of them in various projects.


Similar resistor kit to the one I have. Lots of values at a low price.



Nice looking larger value capacitor kit.

 


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